La Traviata, Glossary and Works Cited

La Traviata, Glossary and Works Cited

Posted by Ross Hagen in Online Learning 17 Dec 2013

Aria: a solo scene in an opera in which a character expresses inner feelings to the audience, roughly analogous to the Shakespearean soliloquy

Brindisi: a drinking song, typically introduced as a toast by one character

Cabaletta: the fast final part of a solo scene or ensemble, which typically ends with a virtuosic vocal display. It follows the slower cantabile and transitional tempo di mezzo section, and in Verdi’s hands usually introduces an emotional change or resolution.

Cantabile: the first part of a solo aria or ensemble, cantabile sections are typically slow, song-like, and flowing in nature.

Coloratura: operatic singing (usually by a soprano) marked by virtuosic ornamentation and embellishment and a particularly high range.

Concertato: In this ensemble form, multiple characters weave their melodies together. It typically functions as a finale for the acts of an opera.

Reminiscence Motive: a musical theme that recurs over an opera as a reference to earlier events.

Scena: A typical Italian opera scene, structured with a slow cantabile, a transitional tempo di mezzo, and finishing with a fast cabaletta.

Tempo di Mezzo: a short transitional section in between the cantabile and cabaletta sections in a scena, it typically introduces a conflict or change in emotion.

Tritone: A particularly unstable and dissonant interval where two notes are separated by three whole steps. Over the 19th century, it became commonly used as a reference for something evil or scary.

 

Works Cited

Budden, Julian. The Operas of Verdi. Vol. 2. London: Cassell Ltd, 1978.

Dalhaus, Carl. Realism in Nineteenth-Century Music. Trans. Mary Whittall. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985.

De Van, Gilles. Verdi’s Theater: Creating Drama Through Music. Trans. Gilda Roberts. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1998.

Fishberg, Maurice. Pulmonary Tuberculosis. 3rd Ed. New York: Lea and Febiger, 1922.

Rosselli, John. The Life of Verdi. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Taruskin, Richard. Music in the Nineteenth Century. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.

La Traviata. Dir. Carlo Rizzi, Willy Decker. Perf. Anna Netrebko, Rolando Villazón, Thomas Hampson. Deutsche Grammophon, 2006. DVD.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone